April 2016 Gina G.
I am very happy with how my move went. From Joe, my estimator, to the ladies in the office, to the crew, it was all excellent. Joe was extremely responsive and helpful from the time he gave me the estimate until my move date. The crew was great... They wrapped everything up as if I was moving much further than a mile! I would definitely use them again and highly recommend them.
21 May 2016 // from
Share this page:
RSS
Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn
YouTube
YouTube
Glassdoor

After his years in the armed forces, Edward Buggs joined JK as our Military/Government Services Coordinator. In this video, Buggs explains his role at JK, as well as his initial surprise at how the moving industry is an incredibly logistical operation. Watch the video below to hear Buggs’ story!

We wish all members of the military a happy Armed Forces Day. We appreciate all that you do!

This video is part of JK’s #TalentTuesday series, which you can view immediately as they are posted on Tuesdays to our social media pages: Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn.

You can also view more of our posts about moving members of the armed forces by clicking here.

19 May 2016 // from
Share this page:
RSS
Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn
YouTube
YouTube
Glassdoor

For our U.S. service members, moving within the military is complex, with different rules, regulations, and offices to work with. To prevent any stalls in the move, it is best to be familiar with all of the acronyms and jargon used in military moves. JK has proudly moved thousands of service members over the years, so we are familiar with all of the lingo used. Use the list below to stay on top of your military move terminology.

Common Carrier

A utility or business that transports people and/or goods from one place to another for a fee. This includes buses, taxis, commercial airplanes, passenger trains, etc.

CONUS – Contiguous United States

The term used to describe locations within the 48 contiguous states. This excludes Alaska and Hawaii. There is also Outside of Contiguous United States (OCONUS).

DPS – Defense Personal Property System

The website that military members use when managing their PCS. Military members have the opportunity to request specific movers, but there is no guarantee their request will be granted. This is because the request cannot override the system. The DPS lists movers based on their “Best Value Scores” calculated from military surveys (similar to customer satisfaction surveys).

NOTE: If you would like to request JK Moving Services as your carrier, use the designation code JKMS.

MCO – Military Claims Officer

The person in charge of military claims. With military claims, the member has 75 days from delivery of their goods to notify the TSP of a claim. There is no need to go into specific detail at the time of notification. The service member has nine months from delivery to submit their claim. And while nine months is allowed, the sooner the claim is submitted, the sooner any damages or issues can be addressed.

NTS – Non Temporary Storage

After 90 days of SIT, the goods will then be considered NTS. Military members will receive email notifications from DPS to guide them through the process.

PCS – Permanent Change of Station

When a military member is going from one assignment to the next.

POV – Privately Owned Vehicle

This is your own personal vehicle. During PCS moves, sometimes the government will reimburse military members to travel in their own vehicle, rather than by common carrier.

PPSO – Personal Property Shipping Office

The local branch that helps military members with the move process. The PPO will assist the military member throughout the move.

PPO – Personal Property Officer

A person from the PPSO designated to guide military members through their moves.

Pro-Gear (PBP&E) – Professional Books Property & Equipment

There are exceptions to the weight allowances set by the government. Military members receive these allowances based on their Pro-Gear, which is anything that is work related. For example, if you are an Artillery Office and your job requires you to keep specific books, this would be considered Pro-Gear. It is important to note, if you have Pro-Gear, tell your TSP before the move starts so it can be documented. This will save you from additional charges from being over the weight allowance.

SIT – Storage In Transit

When household goods arrive at the new location, but the house is not ready, the items will be stored in an approved warehouse. Items can only be in SIT for a maximum of 90 days.

TSP – Transportation Service Provider

The company in charge of moving the belongings.

Weight Allowance

Military moves are paid for by the federal government. The government places a weight allowance on the move based on the military member’s rank. For an updated weight allowance, military members should talk to their PPO.

These are just some of the common acronyms used in military moves. If you have any additional questions, please contact your PPO or a military move coordinator.

16 May 2016 // from
Share this page:
RSS
Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn
YouTube
YouTube
Glassdoor

0412160914a_HDR

Recently, all of JK Moving Services’ Move Managers came to JK’s headquarters in Sterling, Virginia to attend our annual Move Manager Workshops, a series of training sessions that recommit our long-distance drivers to the top safety practices.

Move Managers

Why do we call our drivers “Move Managers?” Because they are much more than drivers. Sure, they drive the vehicles, but they are also responsible for the crews that load and unload your belongings. JK’s Move Managers know the best packing and transporting procedures – how to prevent damage to your items and home during the move – and are up to date with the myriad relevant industry regulations. They also serve as your in-person point-of-contact from loading your belongings to the delivery. Driving is only one of the many responsibilities that Move Managers assume. You can hear about Harvie “Zo” Henry’s experiences as one of JK’s Move Managers in this video.

The workshops are led by Training Manager, Karl Holder, and Director of Safety and Compliance, Jeff Parker. The Move Managers attend two days of classroom presentations and active scenarios, designed to teach and reinforce safety practices before assessing them through practice. JK advises its drivers, “if you don’t know, don’t go” – emphasizing to our Move Managers that caution is appreciated, and safety is always the most important consideration.

vehicle check

Karl Holder guides the Move Managers through a quick vehicle check before the practical PACE exercises.

PACE Training

A main goal of these workshops is to ensure that JK’s Move Managers remain PACE-certified. PACE stands for Plan ahead, Analyze the surroundings, Communicate with others, and Execute safe driving. PACE training teaches drivers how to be aware of all risk factors before, during, and after a drive. The PACE behavioral driving instruction consists of both classroom and behind-the-wheel sections.
For those of you thinking that safe driving is simple – just stay off your phone and pay attention to the road – think again! JK’s Move Manager Workshops take safety to another level. For example, were you aware that at 55 miles per hour, a commercial truck specifically requires 50 more feet than a passenger vehicle to come to a complete stop? Our Move Managers are!

Because commercial trucks require more time and distance to slow down and stop, drivers must be aware of the risk factors that have the potential to alter their current path. To avoid these risks, drivers should travel in the “lane of least resistance.” That is, the lane that will allow the vehicle to continue without altering its current path or speed. The drivers must be aware of everything around them – vehicles that may slow down to park, turning vehicles, construction that obstructs a lane, distracted drivers, etc. By staying aware of these risk factors, drivers can identify the lane of least resistance and continue on their path unhindered.

You can read more about PACE training here.

lane of least resistance

The Lane of Least Resistance gives the driver room to maneuver in case of emergencies.

A Culture of Safety

JK’s continued commitment to safety is part of our dedication to make safety a part of our culture. By requiring all of our Move Managers to participate in our Move Manager Workshops, and making sure they all receive PACE certifications, JK aims to instill safe practices at all levels – not just commercial driving.

“These workshops are designed to ensure our drivers are not only protecting your shipments, but also themselves and other drivers on the road,” said Karl Holder. “By committing to safety as part of our culture at JK, we are inspiring a passion for safety in each of our employees. We want these practices to extend beyond our Move Managers’ commercial driving, into their personal lives and, by extension, the people closest to them.”

Also covered in the Move Manager Workshops were U.S. State Department regulations, paperwork compliance, claims prevention, pre- and post-trip exercises, packing techniques, and more.

We ask you to join our Move Managers in committing to safety, not just as a practice but as a culture. You can read more on our training and safety pages.

View the full album of photos from the Workshops below!

  • JK Moving Services Hosts the 2016 Move Manager Workshops!
14 May 2016 // from
Share this page:
RSS
Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn
YouTube
YouTube
Glassdoor

“It’s a great place to work. It’s a great place to feel like you are part of the team, and you’re given many opportunities to do what you want to do within the company — the possibilities are endless… You do have opportunities to move throughout the company and learn.”

Check out Shannon Challberg’s full video below and see how she learned to exemplify one of JK’s enterprise core values, Connect the Dots.

This video is part of JK’s #TalentTuesday series, which you can view immediately as they are posted on Tuesdays to our social media pages: Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn.

6 May 2016 // from
Share this page:
RSS
Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn
YouTube
YouTube
Glassdoor
Senior Move Managers are key to a successful senior relocation.

Senior Move Managers are key to a successful senior relocation.

Older adults and senior citizens face unique challenges when moving, ones that can often prevent them from effectively preparing for the move. Their adult children will often step in to assist in the process, and while that is helpful, it can also create some difficulties for the movers. To make your mother or father’s move as smooth as possible, we offer the following advice.

  1. Downsize

    Use this time to decide what is important and necessary to keep. Organize items into the following categories: to keep, to sell, to donate, to recycle or dispose of.

  2. Agree upon a decision-maker

    While family members can be of great help, it is difficult for a moving company when they do not know which person they should be communicating with. Sit down with your family members and choose a “liaison” that will be the primary point of contact with the moving consultant or move coordinator. This is easier on all parties and lessens potential for miscommunication.

  3. Use the destination floor plan to decide beforehand where you want items to go

    Many of us can be indecisive when it comes to arranging furniture in our home, and if you are downsizing, this can be a particular challenge. If you use the new home’s floor plan, you can decide beforehand where items should go. This makes it faster and easier for the move-in crew, and will help your parent be more comfortable with the fast pace of the move.

  4. Have special requests ready ahead of time

    If you have any special requests, such as adding items or stops to your move, be sure your moving company is informed. Beginning the move with an organized plan helps ensure that everything will go smoothly, with minimal interruptions.

Allowing the move to keep, well, moving is key. By following the above advice, you can help make your parent’s move go as smooth as possible.

4 May 2016 // from
Share this page:
RSS
Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn
YouTube
YouTube
Glassdoor

A long time ago, in a galaxy not-so-far away….

JK Moving Services Moving Consultant, Eric Vislay, was managing a move from Northern Virginia to New York City when he felt a disturbance in the Force. When the customer told Eric, “I have something you’ve never seen before,” Eric, a veteran of the moving industry, replied, “I’ve seen everything.” After seeing what the customer wanted to move to the new apartment, Eric confessed he had never seen anything like it.

The customer, moving from a house to a smaller New York City apartment, had a lot of downsizing to do, but there was one item he absolutely was set on keeping — a valuable Star Wars collectible from The Empire Strikes Back and Return of the Jedi, Han Solo. Well, the prop of Han Solo frozen in carbonite by Darth Vader. The life-sized carbonite Han Solo was one of a small handful of official props used in the Star Wars films.

Due to the amount of sentimental value placed on the item, Eric Vislay had a custom pallet created to protect it during shipment. While JK did move Han Solo, we assure you that Boba Fett was not among our moving crew, and that Han was safely delivered to his owner in New York City, not to Jabba the Hut on Tatooine.

Happy Star Wars Day and May the Fourth be with you.